The Carnegie Deli: A Den of Jewish Indulgence

New York City, a sprawling metropolis, there are so many places and things to see here that it would take probably a lifetime. There is one particular little locale, however, that I would like to bring to my fellow Aryanists’ attention. It is some ten blocks up 7th Avenue from Times Square, right by the southwestern corner of the intersection with 55th Street. A new visitor is likely to spot the huge sign to the Wellington Hotel just across the street from this place, but there is a red awning that extends out onto the sidewalk with the sign: Carnegie Deli. There is even another small sign just above it reading: World’s Best. Seeing how it’s in the middle of New York City, some blunt capitalist jargon is not really all that out of place.

Inside is where the place starts to actually get interesting. There is a delicatessen where a customer can by something like they do in a market, but most people proceed to the restaurant that makes up most of the locale’s interior. I’ve been inside three times at various hours from early afternoon to evening and the place has always been packed. The first thing that can be seen here are the pictures on the wall, they’re everywhere, virtually every bit of wall space had a framed photo of a celebrity who was here at some point. Certainly a unique interior design choice, not many places that I’ve been to have it, but it also hit me that this is perfect appeal to the vanity and attention obsessed Facebook generation, which was made possible by digital photography; copious amounts of pictures can be taken and loaded up online for display and delusions of fame. Popular media also is keen on covering celebrity stories and what movie stars do with their personal lives, what they wear, and where they go out. So this business, keen on trends, made sure to tap into that and maximize profit.

However, the real meat of the matter is just that, meat. Lots of it. A sickening amount of it. Not only is nearly every dish meat based, the portions are, to put it lightly, absolutely absurd. Ironically, “carne” is a root meaning “meat.” Now, I used to eat meat, I used to like meat, but even during the times when I found great enjoyment in a steak dinner or any well-made meat dish, I still found the portions here insane.

Just take a look at one of their sandwiches:


Kosher, meaning “Gluttonous Indulgence from Slaughter”

To any Aryanist, it should be no surprise that this Den of Indulgence is Jewish themed. The whole menu is kosher and one of the house specialty dishes is called “The Woody Allen” referring to one of New York’s most famous Jewish residents. The free appetizer given to each table is a set of pickles, which are very common in Eastern European Slavic culture, but did you actually expect the Jews to not plagiarize or manipulate something?

I usually talk about films here, but I found this restaurant relevant, since the place overall does convey a message, a most un-Aryan message, and one that can be summed up as: “Consume you goyim!” The monstrous portions, appeal to superficiality, mounds of kosherized flesh all amount to ZC approved culture. This isn’t the only place to do so, but from this example, an Aryanist should easily be able to see others like it, even if they do not contain all of the elements that this place does. The trend of large portions is especially popular in American restaurants and people are actually asking questions like “Why is there so much obesity?” This is when Aryanists usually facepalm.

Also, I have sort of confessed to eating at this kosher lair a few times, two times was before I became an Aryanist. The last time, however, was not too long ago and that’s when I got the idea for this article. I wanted to show a friend of mine something “exclusively New York” but soon realized it was a mistake. I ordered the Central Park Garden Salad, one of few dishes without meat and the only one I remember having no goy-products, though for an extra $8 they’ll serve it to you with grilled chicken! Another facepalm.

This may be a weird suggestion to my fellow Aryanists, but you should check this place out. If you eat, it’ll probably be that salad I had, but the point is to see everything our movement disapproves of and seeks to correct with human civilization. This may help you see your own position better, a “know thy enemy” sort of thing. I, for one, wrote this little essay due to my last (and it will remain my last) visit there. Though, there is no shortage of locales like this one, so if you do not wish to feed the ZC Beast, which is probably a smarter move, then may I suggest, going on an investigative trip to any other restaurant of your choosing. It may seem obvious or even pointless, but a closer inspection at the very apparent lack of Aryan Frugality in our civilization just may tell you something that was too obvious to take note of in the first place. This goes for many of the issues we face. But noting such a thing, often results in something useful, even if just on a personal level. Aryanism is not just a spiritual or political movement, as Der Fuhrer spoke many many years ago, it is the will to recreate mankind anew! Thus, there is nowhere we shouldn’t look for possibility improvement.

About Miecz Elizejski

Kindling a Kampf deep in Zionist-occupied territory.
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5 Responses to The Carnegie Deli: A Den of Jewish Indulgence

  1. Im always amazed at how much Americans eat, there is nothing wrong with a healthy appetite, but that sandwich is ridiculous.

    Komerad, how long have you lived in New York?

  2. Oh many Americans take pride in how much they can eat. Just do research on “deep fried food festivals” in the Mid-Western US… insanity!

    I have lived in NYC for just over a year now. It's the other capital city of the USA. Politicans may be in DC, but the banks are here.

  3. Osaka Ali says:

    Your restaurant review brought out my nostalgia for the time that I lived and worked in New York. That was so many years ago (Lower East Side, Manhattan) … to my mis(?)-fortune, I had never been to Carnegie, Katz’s, Russian Tea Room, etc., etc..

    In my mid-twenties, I became a vegetarian, but not a vegan. At that time, I had ‘escaped from New York’, never to return. My anti-Carnegie, if I can call it that, because right now, I can’t remember the name, was a little vegetarian ‘deli’ on Colorado Avenue in Santa Monica. It has since disappeared.

    The two women who worked behind the counter always wore white, spoke softly and served impeccably prepared food to me and my friends.

    I now regret not sharing the experience with more people and for forgetting the name of the place.

    Since then I reverted to carnivorism, but have been rethinking this choice a lot lately.

    • Vegetarianism gets a lot of bad press, but a significant reduction in meat consumption will more than help the individual body achieve better health, the effects on the planet will be substantial also when the meat industry wanes. Industrial farms are a horror and only from the moral particularism of a cult that endorses “kosher” could such filth sprout and spread. Halal is marginally better in it’s reasoning in that we can see the schism between Judaism and Islam, since the latter considers all sentient creatures to be potential Muslims whereas in Judaism it’s a birthright – must be born of a Jewish mother – in other words, it’s eugenics. Thus, “goys” are free to be slaughtered and exploited.

      Contrast that with Islam where all are considered Muslim, or not thought of as outsiders, if they merit the title based on their character and deeds.

      Judaism only has “righteous Gentiles” – by default outsiders who are “better” than other “goyim.”

      Whereas Islam has “honorary Muslims” or by default insiders, fellow folk.

      Food based on honest labor vs sentient exploration is an indicator of these higher ideals in each worldview.

      • Osaka Ali says:

        Indeed. It is recorded that the Prophet ﷺ said the following:
        “Each child is born in a state of “Fitrah” (in other words, as a Muslim – my commentary), but his parents make him a Jew or a Christian [or a Zoroastrian]. It is like the way an animal gives birth to a normal offspring. Have you noticed any (young animal) born mutilated before you mutilate them?” (Saheeh Al-Bukhari, Saheeh Muslim)

        I hope that my reminiscence doesn’t come off as egotistical, but I remember my time as a vegetarian in a very idyllic sense. Not having thought about it in a while, my vague recollection is of having been ‘shamed’ or teased into carnivorism.

        Incidentally, at that time, I was a student of the Buddha.

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